Dance Without Borders

In the opening moments of “La Bruja,” a traditional folk dance from Veracruz newly reinterpreted by the New York City-based Ballet Nepantla, a spotlight trains on a barefoot dancer in a red dress — the witch — pirouetting at center stage. She is soon joined by a shirtless male “victim” who executes a series of acrobatic lifts as they take turns pursuing one another across the stage. It’s a prototypical contemporary ballet duet, until something surprising happens: Six dancers in flowing white dresses and high-heeled shoes emerge from the wings and place flickering candles atop their heads. Their feet strike an intricate pattern as the candles remain stationary, as though levitating. Meanwhile, the contemporary pair weaves in and out of the folk dancers in an ethereal braid entwining new and old, seduction and pursuit, and life and death.  Read more in the Texas Observer.

Super Tuesday for the Border Wall

Seven cities across Texas’s Rio Grande Valley approved anti–border wall resolutions Tuesday in a unified show of grassroots opposition by the communities that would be most impacted by the wall’s construction. As environmental and immigrant-rights activists scrambled from one city hall to another at meetings that lasted from noon to after 9 P.M., McAllen, Edinburg, Pharr, San Juan, Alamo, Palmview, and Sullivan City all unanimously approved resolutions. They joined the cities of Brownsville, Mission, La Joya, and Weslaco—as well as the Hidalgo County Commissioners Court—which had already gone on the record against President Trump’s planned wall.  Read more in Sierra…

The Endangered Baby Turtles in Harvey’s Path–And a Desperate Race to Save Them

As storm surges drown eggs and rough surf strands weeks-old hatchlings, workers at Sea Turtle, Inc., a rescue and rehabilitation non-profit based on South Padre Island, are racing to save endangered sea turtles. Rescue center staff began preparing for Harvey on Wednesday, collecting eggs from nests along 50 miles of beach from the Rio Grande River to Port Mansfield. “We knew the surge would be significant enough that that the eggs would have been drowned, said Jeff George, Sea Turtle, Inc.’s executive director. Read more in the Washington Post…

Border Wall Opponents Stage Major Weekend Protests

A broad coalition of environmental and immigrant rights organizations staged a weekend of protests in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley in response to recently-released maps outlining planned border wall locations. Organizers believe the events represented the largest grassroots movement to date in opposition to one of President Trump’s most divisive policy priorities. Over a thousand border residents gathered at a historic mission and a national wildlife refuge, both of which would be affected by the wall, to protest the potentially devastating effects of the proposed 18- to 30-foot-high barrier on wildlife habitat and local communities. Read more in Sierra.

Biking with Birds

Not a half-hour into my daylong adventure, in the middle of a prairie of sea lavender and leatherleaf, I stopped my bike in wonder. A few dozen yards from the pavement, dozens of sandhill cranes comingled with a flock of ivory snow geese, completely ignoring my entrance into this unspoiled coastal scene. I had hoped for such moments when I decided to explore Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge by bicycle. Maybe the famous avian residents—and even its mammals—wouldn’t notice me like they would if I arrived in a noisy car? At the same time, I could pedal to some of the refuge’s more far-flung attractions—and there was a lot of ground to cover. Read more in Texas Highways.

The Birder’s Nest

My son Byrdie had been anticipating our planned visit to the Alamo Inn B&B for weeks. The two of us have been birding ever since Byrdie, then two years old, pulled down an unused field guide from the bookshelf and asked me to read it to him as a bedtime story. He’s six now, and thanks to him I’ve caught the birding bug, too. Still, for all our countless trips to birding destinations near and far, we’d never stayed at a place designed by and for birders. Adding to Byrdie’s excitement, he had recently decided he wanted to be a travel writer—he’s also wanted to be an ornithologist, a veterinarian, and an astronaut—and he was looking forward to serving as my apprentice. Read more in Texas Highways.

Laughter, Fear, and Trump at the Spanish-Language Circus

As I drove toward the small border city of Donna on a cold and misty February evening, the circus tent’s eight floodlight-topped spires glowed Oz-like in the distance. I parked my car in the free lot, property of a neighboring farm-implements dealer, and joined the throng of circus-goers following a path lined by purple flags mounted atop a wooden fence. On the other side was a line of motor homes. My imagination conjured up images of clowns and acrobats inside, applying makeup and readjusting sequined outfits with all the fidgety trepidation of opening night. Keep reading at the Texas Observer